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New in version 1.2.0.

This builtin version of RQScheduler is still in alpha, use at your own risk!

If you need a battle tested version of RQ job scheduling, please take a look at https://github.com/rq/rq-scheduler instead.

New in RQ 1.2.0 is RQScheduler, a built-in component that allows you to schedule jobs for future execution.

This component is developed based on prior experience of developing the external rq-scheduler library. The goal of taking this component in house is to allow RQ to have job scheduling capabilities without:

  1. Running a separate rqscheduler CLI command.
  2. Worrying about a separate Scheduler class.

Scheduling Jobs for Execution

There are two main APIs to schedule jobs for execution, enqueue_at() and enqueue_in().

queue.enqueue_at() works almost like queue.enqueue(), except that it expects a datetime for its first argument.

from datetime import datetime
from rq import Queue
from redis import Redis
from somewhere import say_hello

queue = Queue(name='default', connection=Redis())

# Schedules job to be run at 9:15, October 10th in the local timezone
job = queue.enqueue_at(datetime(2019, 10, 8, 9, 15), say_hello)

Note that if you pass in a naive datetime object, RQ will automatically convert it to the local timezone.

queue.enqueue_in() accepts a timedelta as its first argument.

from datetime import timedelta
from rq import Queue
from redis import Redis
from somewhere import say_hello

queue = Queue(name='default', connection=Redis())

# Schedules job to be run in 10 seconds
job = queue.enqueue_in(timedelta(seconds=10), say_hello)

Jobs that are scheduled for execution are not placed in the queue, but they are stored in ScheduledJobRegistry.

from datetime import timedelta
from redis import Redis

from rq import Queue
from rq.registry import ScheduledJobRegistry

redis = Redis()

queue = Queue(name='default', connection=redis)
job = queue.enqueue_in(timedelta(seconds=10), say_nothing)
print(job in queue)  # Outputs False as job is not enqueued

registry = ScheduledJobRegistry(queue=queue)
print(job in registry)  # Outputs True as job is placed in ScheduledJobRegistry

Running the Scheduler

If you use RQ’s scheduling features, you need to run RQ workers with the scheduler component enabled.

$ rq worker --with-scheduler

You can also run a worker with scheduler enabled in a programmatic way.

from rq import Worker, Queue
from redis import Redis

redis = Redis()

queue = Queue(connection=redis)
worker = Worker(queues=[queue], connection=redis)
worker.work(with_scheduler=True)

Only a single scheduler can run for a specific queue at any one time. If you run multiple workers with scheduler enabled, only one scheduler will be actively working for a given queue.

Active schedulers are responsible for enqueueing scheduled jobs. Active schedulers will check for scheduled jobs once every second.

Idle schedulers will periodically (every 15 minutes) check whether the queues they’re responsible for have active schedulers. If they don’t, one of the idle schedulers will start working. This way, if a worker with active scheduler dies, the scheduling work will be picked up by other workers with the scheduling component enabled.